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January 11, 2014

 

 

 

Today marks the 85th anniversary of Tintin’s first appearance, in Le Petit Vingtième magazine, on 10 January 1929.

Happy Birthday Tintin!!

 
 

 

 

 

 

An interview with Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson

With two days to go before the release of The Adventures of Tintin in the US, The Hollywood Reporter website has just published a 26-minute video interview with Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson. From the moment Spielberg first spoke with Here to the process of putting the final touches on the movie, this interview covers it all… in HD!

 
 

 

 

 

The Adventures Of Tintin - The Complete Collection All 21 Adventures

On DVD (1991)

Adventure, Animation, Crime, Family, On DVD

In Collection
#434

897 mins France/English

 

 
 

Full Cast & Crew

Colin O'Meara 

  Tintin (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Tom Kneebone 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

Thierry Wermuth 

  Tintin (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Keith Knight 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

Christian Pellissier 

  Le capitaine Haddock (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Michael Lamport 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

Henri Labussière

 Le professeur Tournesol (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Harvey Atkin 

 Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Yves Barsacq 

 Dupont (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

David Huband 

Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Jean-Pierre Moulin 

  Dupond (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Neil Munro 

  Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Susan Roman 

 Snowy (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Frank Perry 

  Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Paul Haddad 

  Additional Voices (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Mario Romano 

  Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Graham Haley 

  Additional Voices (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

August Schellenberg 

  Additional Voices (13 episodes, 1992)

Ray Landry 

 Additional Voices (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Maureen Forrester 

 Bianca Castafiore (8 episodes, 1991-1992)

Frank Proctor 

 Additional Voices (39 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Vernon Chapman 

  Nestor (7 episodes, 1991-1992)

John Stocker 

  Thompson (37 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Arnold Gelderman 

  Scharlaken Rackham (3 episodes, 1991)

Dan Hennessey 

  Thomson (37 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Julie Lemieux 

  Chang (2 episodes, 1991)

David Fox 

 Captain Haddock (28 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Ho Chow 

(1 episode, 1991)

Wayne Robson 

Professor Calculus (28 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Peter Meech 

  Radio Announcer (unknown episodes)

Denis Akiyama 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Marie Vincent 

  Bianca Castafiore (uncredited) (9 episodes, 1991-1992)

Robert Cait 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Marc Moro 

  Allan Thompson (uncredited) (8 episodes, 1991-1992)

Graeme Campbell 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Michel Ruhl 

 Nestor (uncredited) (7 episodes, 1991-1992)

Liz Dufresne 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Georges Berthomieu 

  Séraphin Lampion (uncredited) (4 episodes, 1991-1992)

Keith Hampshire 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

Sophie Arthuys 

  Abdallah (uncredited) (4 episodes, 1992)

Marvin Ishmael 

  Additional Voices (26 episodes, 1991-1992)

 

David Lesser 

  Tchang (uncredited) (2 episodes, 1991)

 

 

 

Patricia Legrand 

  Zorrino (uncredited) (2 episodes, 1992)

   

Check Out All The Adventures Of Tintin

 

CheckOutAllTheAdventures

 

 

Destination Moon- Published in 1953.

Destination Moon- Published in 1953.

Barely have they returned from their adventures in the Middle East (Land of Black Gold) when Tintin, Captain Haddock and Snowy receive an invitation to Klow, the capital city of Syldavia. Professor Calculus is in the country working on a top-secret project in a state-of-the-art secure government facility: the Sprodj Atomic Research Centre.The subsoil of the remote region in which the Sprodj Centre is located is rich in the radioactmaive element uranium. The Syldavian government and Professor Calculus’s scientists hope to harness atomic energy as a way of propelling mankind into a new era of space exploration. Yet, behind the scenes, there is a sinister plot by aggressive foreign powers to hijack this technology for nefarious ends.In the end, whatever the stakes, Professor Calculus is determined to achieve his goal: to build a rocket that will transport human beings to the moon. But who will he take with him on this historic journey?

 

Explorers on the Moon- Published in 1954.

Explorers on the Moon- Published in 1954.

Tensions are running high at the Sprodj Atomic Research Centre near Klow, the capital city of Syldavia. Contact with the moon rocket has been lost. It turns out that the passengers have temporarily been knocked unconscious by the terrible pressure exerted by the moon rocket’s acceleration.There is an unwelcome surprise in store for the astronauts when they awake. Despite the meticulous prelaunch planning, there are two extra passengers on board: Thomson and Thompson!The extra people on board cause a shortage of oxygen — supplies have only been calculated for four people and a dog. Will the heroes manage to make it through this adventure in one piece?

 

 

Land of Black Gold - Published in 1950.

Land of Black Gold - Published in 1950.

This history began in 1939 but was interrupted during the war for the benefit of the crab claws of gold. She only was repeated, in its second version, as in 1948. She had to take into account the characters created in the meantime and Moulinsart. Note that by the disappearance of Haddock page 3, page 54, rightful cannot really give explanations in his absence. In 1969, Hergé makes changes to the album, allowing it to refresh conflicts. We note the return of Dr. Müller, renamed Smith, and Oliveira de Figueras but especially the emergence of the Emir Ben Kalish Ezab and his son Abdallah, inspired by the potrait of Faycal II.

Flight 714 - Published in 1968.

Flight 714 - Published in 1968.

In 1966, the adventure is. There are several protagonists as Rastapopulos, which appears more grotesque than bad. The man who laughs ever, the millionaire Carreidas was introduced, representing a certain Marcel Dassault for Hergé. It is a true cheat but who is not a bad background which makes it ironic. Indeed, with the truth serum, we learn his wrongdoing. The fascination of Hergé for the paranormal is back, embodied by Mik Ezdaditoff, inspired by animator and writer Jacques Bergier, which communicates by telepathy with other characters. The end of history will allow even to address the extraterrestrials.

 

The Black Island - Published in 1938.

The Black Island - Published in 1938.

First edition book (Belgium) published 1938. Tintin hopes for a well-earned rest following his escapades in Latin America (The Broken Ear), but his hopes are quickly dashed. As he comes to the aid of an aircraft that has made a forced landing, one of the pilots shoots him. This is the beginning of an adventure that takes Tintin to Great Britain, where certain people are determined to make him disappear once and for all. Framed for theft, Tintin is arrested by Thomson & Thompson, who are on the trail of a gang of counterfeiters. Tintin discovers that the head of the organization is the sinister Doctor J.W. Müller, and that the printing press used to create the false money is hidden on the terrifying Black Island, off the coast of Scotland. According to local folklore, the island is haunted by a wild beast. Will Tintin discover the truth behind these stories? Backstory Once again inspired by the news of his time, Hergé based his story on reports that counterfeit Russian currency was being smuggled into the Soviet Union to destabilize its economy. Dr. Georg Bell, a Scotsman who had become a German citizen, orchestrated this counterfeiting scheme in a deal with the Nazi Party, and here he serves as the source for Hergé’s sinister Doctor Müller character. With Ranko the Gorilla, Hergé revisited — in his own way — the legend of the Loch Ness monster. This story also introduced television, a new technology of the time. Two years before this story was written, the BBC in England had introduced the world’s first high-definition television service. When Tintin breaks into the office of the leader of a counterfeiters’ ring, he finds himself in front of a television.

King Ottokar's Sceptre - Published in 1939.

King Ottokar's Sceptre - Published in 1939.

The story appears in the Petit Vingtième in 1938. The Austria is then very threatened by the Germany. Hergé uses this for the entry of Tintin in history. It is the symbol of the political commitment of Hergé. In this album, the Borduria wants to capture the Syldavia with the help of a certain Müsstler, recalling, not by chance, Mussolini and Hitler. The reader discovers the Syldavia through a brochure read by Tintin in the aircraft. The Diva Bianca Castafiore of appeared in this adventure.

 

The Seven Crystal Balls - Published in 1948.

The Seven Crystal Balls - Published in 1948.

This album marks the end of the war. It is a scary story which mingles with the curse, as in cigars of the Pharaoh, and fear, as in the mysterious star.A series of attacks enigmatic and the passage of the villa of the Professor Paris sétalent in this adventure. Hergé gives more emphasis to the scenery and backgrounds. For evidence, the villa of Paris had originated several sketches of a Belgian villa occupied by the S.S.

Prisoners of the Sun - Published in 1949.

Prisoners of the Sun - Published in 1949.

On 26 September 1946 appears to be the first issue of the Journal Tintin, where all the adventures of reporter will have their place. Hergé adapts to his new medium, well most prestigious best. The story picks up where she was arrested with a long press clipping summarizing previous events. The Tintin Journal has downs of documentary pages allowing Hergé to explain, for example, the life of the Incas, without overloading the story. The slightest details of this adventure had been a rigorous documentation from the archaeological documents and a thick volume of Charles Wiener, entitled Peru and Bolivia. Later, this adventure will be brought to the big screen.

 

The Shooting Star - Published in 1942.

The Shooting Star - Published in 1942.

In 1942, the mysterious star is the first album to be printed in spot. Casterman imposes on Hergé standard 62 pages instead of 100-130 of before. The author creates the Hergé Studios, in 1950, to redesign its albums. The war was rampant, Hergé can no longer talk about the news. It must change the ideas of its readers. It then focuses on fantasy. To be published under occupation, it must self-censorship by imagining fictional countries, or by using neutral countries, to deal with the research of a meteor in the open sea. Hergé is dissatisfied with this album. He regrets not having produced a model of the ship Aurora but he change it for the secret of the Unicorn. Moreover, he failed to find a politically correct name, the pattern of the Peary expedition financial, it sometimes having a Jewish, sometimes Israelite connotation.

The Broken Ear - Published in 1937.

The Broken Ear - Published in 1937.

First edition album (Belgium) published in 1937. Published for the first time in the Petit Vingtième in 1935, it is the first album in which Hergé staged fictional territories. It is San Theodoros, which brings together all mythologies of South America. A history of oil is at the origin of a conflict with the neighbouring Nuevo Rico. Talking in reality a conflict which caused 500,000 deaths, between the Bolivia and the Paraguay. The great feature of the broken ear is that the first and last page back to the same places, same sets, and the same characters. It falls on his feet as if nothing had happened.

 

The Crab with the Golden Claws - Published in 1941.

The Crab with the Golden Claws - Published in 1941.

The war is in full swing in 1940 and puts an end to the existence of the Petit Vingtième. Hergé esr then hired by the evening. It must quickly provide scripts daily, shorter. He is now seeking to hold on the reader to each line. This adventure again addresses the theme of drug trafficking. Allan Thompson, lieutenant Karaboudjan, that it will be with Rastapopulos, above all, Captain Haddock, are emerging. He is a drunkard in the marked face but has good sides immediately detected by Tintin who takes him with him. His penchant for the bottle changes often a devastating gross originally many disasters. The captain is found in the land of thirst, what will be, for him, an alcohol treatment.

Tintin in Tibet - Published in 1960.

Tintin in Tibet - Published in 1960.

Hergé is then in domestic crisis. This album took the form of an exorcism, which gives it its special nature. Little protagonists, a simple and linear action gave rise to a Tintin more human looking for his lost friend. Haddock is present to keep a humorous touch and do not immerse in the pathos. The dominance of white focuses the reader on the tragedy that has occurred. This album was also the occasion for the author, give free rein to his fascination with the Orient and the paranormal.

 

The Blue Lotus - Published in 1936.

The Blue Lotus - Published in 1936.

First edition album (Belgium) published 1936 Blue lotus marks a turning point in the work of Hergé. After considering the development of his stories as a secondary activity, he met Chiang, a young Chinese student in Brussels. They sympathisèrent and discussed at length the history and life in China. Including Hergé that China was not what he thought. He then decided to give more importance to the documentation to represent the true things. He wanted to be honest and felt responsible for the image it vehicle in his albums. Tribute to Chiang, he integrates it in the Blue Lotus as a friend of Tintin, which acquires, a humanity that he did not. The Sino-Japanese war was fully operational, and Hergé was able to represent the conflict with a remarkable authenticity, making it the album's more engaged politically. By adopting the Chinese cause, Hergé faces protests from Japanese officials in Brussels.

The Calculus Affair - Published in 1956.

The Calculus Affair - Published in 1956.

This album can be considered as the head of the works of Hergé: wealth of the theme, dialogues well conceived, speed of action, science of the framing, is this volume at the top of the BD. As early as the beginning of the story, an explosion, then a thunderstorm, objects that break, cut current and the arrival of lantern are cycled through. Hergé intended to make possible the more specific places. He went to Geneva to find the most appropriate places. At the time, the cold war dominates. The Switzerland was chosen for its neutrality. The Syldavia and Borduria the represent Eastern and Western blocks. The invention of sunflower well symbolizes this arms race which was raging at the time.

 

Cigars of the Pharaoh - Published in 1934.

Cigars of the Pharaoh - Published in 1934.

Hergé is interested in a new region of the globe: the East. The police officer and fantastic arrive in the adventures of Tintin to make room for an atmosphere of the more mysterious. Curse, poisons, trafficking, and other secret clans dominate the history. It is based on, as no later than in 7 crystal balls, in the case of the curse of Tutankhamun, which made loud noise at the time. Yet Egypt is only a setting to the trafficking of drugs and weapons. Rastapopulos, Dupondt but also Oliveira de Figueras (an international VRP) make their appearance in this album.

The Red Sea Sharks - Published in 1958.

The Red Sea Sharks - Published in 1958.

In 1958, Hergé decided to address the theme of slavery. This album also allows the return of many characters to refine their portrait. Rastapopulos became a first enemy of Tintin because he engages, without pity, a traffic in slaves. At the 1967 reprint, Hergé, accused of racism, should review certain passages because he was talking about little nigger black. We feel that Hergé masters better its characters and he likes to play with.

 

The Secret of the Unicorn - Published in 1943.

The Secret of the Unicorn - Published in 1943.

In 1943, always to move away from the news, Hergé tackles the treasure hunt. To do this, he climbs in the family tree of Haddock, to discover one illustrates and courageous ancestor. Hergé has often been said of this album was his favorite. History tale travel preparation, cleverly mixing three stories which join at the end. Haddock's ancestor François de Hadoque Knight, who lived under Louis XIV. This made him the only character with a story. There in this adventure is what precisely was designed vessel the Unicorn, highlighting the important documentation originally

Red Rackham's Treasure - Published in 1944.

Red Rackham's Treasure - Published in 1944.

This album is marked by the Tryphon sunflower entry in the series. He always wants to join Tintin and Haddock, who return home, but being deaf, he does not understand. It still happens to slip illegally into the Sirius. Sunflower is aid for Tintin, share his submarine, but also by the purchase of the castle of Moulinsart, even if it is not said explicitly. This history of the Haddock residence will be many changes to the origin. The characters now have a fixed place to live out their adventures. It owes its name to a small Belgian village: Sartmoulin, and its architecture in the château de Cheverny.

 

The Castafiore Emerald - Published in 1963.

The Castafiore Emerald - Published in 1963.

This album, released in 1963, is going full at Moulinsart castle. There is very little equity but Hergé still happens keep readers up to the end. The story is only a series of bizzareries and pseudo-disparitions. There are neither conspiracies nor international trafficking, robbery of emerald is the result of the work of a pie thief. The characters are not in shape. Haddock, usually vaillant spends most of his time in a wheelchair for disabled. Tintin, on him, so brave, is scared by an OWL. Even the image of the reporter is denigrated here. Indeed, the visit of two journalists from Paris-Flash is an opportunity to ridicule them. Hergé unleashed in this album, and no one is spared.

Tintin and the Picaros - Published in 1976.

Tintin and the Picaros - Published in 1976.

At this time, Hergé worked more than for his pleasure, that is why he had to wait eight after after flight 714 to Sydney to discover Tintin and the Picaros. Tintin has changed. It is now a jean, practice yoga and rolls in moped. The characters become passive. Now, they undergo the events. Tintin is withdrawal, he refused, first, to follow Haddock in Tapiocapolis. General Alcazar, it plays a leading role and his wife, Peggy, plays an unbearable woman. We also discover General Tapioca next to several ancient knowledge as Pablo, who had saved the life of Tintin in the broken ear. This album is the opportunity to deal with issues political, forgotten for a long time. Hergé notes without denounce as it had done in Tintin in the land of the Soviets. Grow older, our heroes have lost their enthusiasm and their belief that good will always defeat. They are tired and the end of this album is more bitter.

 

Tintin In America - Published in 1932.

Tintin In America - Published in 1932.

 

Tintin in America was published for the first time in the small 20th September 3, 1931. This is the only album in which appears an actual amount in character individual. It is Al Capone. Hergé was fascinated by the American Indians. He therefore wanted their album consacrerun. After bringing together a lot of information from special editions of journals and books on Indian, it attempts to represent the American of his time, with the war of the gangs and prohibition. He wants to put forward important contrasts in this region still little known in the 1930s.

Tintin In The Congo - Published in 1931.

Tintin In The Congo - Published in 1931.

Tintin in the Congo is the second volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from May 1930 to June 1931. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who are sent to the Belgian Congo to report on events in the country. Amidst various encounters with the native Congolese and wild animals, Tintin unearths a criminal diamond smuggling operation run by the American gangster Al Capone. Following on from Tintin in the Land of the Soviets and bolstered by publicity stunts, Tintin in the Congo was a commercial success, appearing in book form shortly after the serial's conclusion. Hergé continued The Adventures of Tintin with Tintin in America in 1932, and the series subsequently became a defining part of the Franco-Belgian comics tradition. In 1946, Hergé re-drew and coloured Tintin in the Congo in his distinctive ligne-claire style for republication by Casterman, with further alterations made for a 1975 edition. In the late 20th century, Tintin in the Congo came under criticism for its perceived racist colonial attitude to the Congolese and glorification of big-game hunting, and attempts were made in Belgium, the United Kingdom, and the United States to restrict its availability to children.

 

Tintin in the Land of the Soviets - Published in 1930.

TintinInTheLandOfTheSoviets

Tintin witnesses a local election, where the Bolsheviks threaten the voters to ensure their own victory; when they try to arrest him, he dresses as a ghost to scare them away. Tintin attempts to make his way out of the Soviet Union, but the Bolsheviks pursue and arrest him, then threaten him with torture. Escaping his captors, Tintin reaches Moscow, remarking that the Bolsheviks have turned it into "a stinking slum". He and Snowy observe a government official handing out bread to homeless Marxists but denying it to their opponents; Snowy steals a loaf and gives it to a starving boy. Spying on a secret Bolshevik meeting, Tintin learns that all the Soviet grain is being exported abroad for propaganda purposes, leaving the people starving, and that the government plans to "organise an expedition against the kulaks, the rich peasants, and force them at gunpoint to give us their corn."

Tintin infiltrates the Soviet army and warns some of the kulaks to hide their grain, but the army catches him and sentences him to death by firing squad. By planting blanks in the soldiers' rifles, Tintin fakes his death and is able to make his way into the snowy wilderness, where he discovers an underground Bolshevik hideaway in a haunted house. A Bolshevik then captures him and informs him, "You're in the hideout where Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin have collected together wealth stolen from the people!" With Snowy's help, Tintin escapes, commandeers a plane, and flies into the night. The plane crashes, but Tintin fashions a new propeller from a tree using a penknife, and continues to Berlin. The OGPU agents appear and lock Tintin in a dungeon, but he escapes with the aid of Snowy, who has dressed himself in a tiger costume. The last OGPU agent attempts to kidnap Tintin, but this attempt is foiled, leaving the agent threatening, "We'll blow up all the capitals of Europe with dynamite!" Tintin returns to Brussels amidst a huge popular reception.

Tintin and Alph-Art - Published in 1976.

TintinAndAlph-Art

In 1976, a few months after the publication of Tintin and the Picaros, Hergé told the journalist Numa Sadoul that he was contemplating the next adventure of Tintin—setting an entire story in an airport lounge.[1] This idea was dropped, and in 1978, he decided to set the story in the world of modern art. During later years Hergé had grown more and more interested in modern art, even attempting it a few times himself as a hobby; so he chose to incorporate his love of avant-garde artwork into the new story. Hergé was inspired by the Fernand Legros and Elmyr de Hory affair, and incorporated a second element, a new age sect and a phoney guru. He planned to cast Rastapopoulos as the villain, but according to Harry Thompson, dropped the idea in 1980 when he introduced the alphabet art element. Still, an idea exists that the villain Ramó Nash or his accomplice Endaddine Akass may be Rastapopoulous in another disguise.

 

 

 

Check Out All The Characters

 

Tintin

Hergé drew inspiration for his star character from the career of the French foreign correspondent Albert Londres. A pioneer of investigative journalism, Londres traveled the world to uncover the truth behind business, politics, governments and the criminal underworld. Tintin represented the reporter that Hergé himself would have liked to be. An instant icon Tintin’s features are simple: a round head, a button for a nose, two dots for eyes and a quiff. This is the key to his success. He is flexible, distinctive yet anonymous: any child or adult, of any age or culture, can identify with him. Tintin and Snowy Although he starts out as an investigative reporter, Tintin develops into a detective. Snowy and others regularly refer to him as Sherlock Holmes, and he has a good deal of the famous English detective about him, including a sharp eye for detail and considerable powers of deduction. Like Holmes, Tintin is a master of disguise! An all-around expert A bit like James Bond, there is no car, motorcycle, locomotive, submarine, airplane, helicopter, horse or camel that Tintin cannot drive, ride, steer or fly. In Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, he carves an airplane propeller from a tree using a pocketknife. In Cigars of the Pharaoh, he fashions a wooden trumpet with which to communicate with the elephants. No matter what situation Tintin finds himself in, he’s never at a loss for what to do. Tintin wholeheartedly embraces the role of the explorer, which culminates in his most memorable achievement — taking the first steps on the moon, some 16 years before the American astronaut Neil Armstrong. By this time, it is clear that Tintin has ceased to report news and is instead making it. Character Image Appea Fun Facts about Tintin Tintin didn’t always have a quiff on his head. During a car chase in his first adventure, Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, the wind blows his hair up, and it stays that way forever after! The Tintin books have been translated into over 100 languages. In German he is called Tim, in Turkish he is called Tenten and in Latin he is known as Titinus. In 1935, when Belgian radio began broadcasting fitness exercises, Hergé drew Tintin listening to the program and exercising with Snowy in Tintin and the Broken Ear.

 

Snowy

Snowy is Tintin’s faithful companion, traversing continents with his adventurous master and saving his life on numerous occasions. Throughout all 24 Tintin adventures, reporter and dog are inseparable. Real-life inspiration Hergé chose a fox terrier as Tintin’s canine companion. At the time, the fox terrier was popular for its character and intelligence — attributes abundantly evident in Snowy. Additionally, the landlord of a restaurant Hergé frequented was the proud owner of a fox terrier, and his dog became the inspiration for Snowy. In all likelihood, however, the landlord’s dog didn’t talk. In that way, Snowy is very much his own dog! A dog’s life Snowy holds a bone While heroic and intelligent, Snowy is still very much a dog. In The Shooting Star, he lies contentedly asleep, his stomach full of sausages. In The Black Island, he picks up a roast chicken from the British Rail restaurant car as Tintin rushes through in pursuit of villains. When faced with the choice between saving his companion and enjoying a delicious bone in King Ottokar’s Sceptre, Snowy hesitates just a bit before he chooses Tintin and saves the day. Fearless…nearly Snowy proves his bravery on numerous occasions. He is a fighter with true terrier traits and is undeterred by bigger, fiercer dogs, lions, cheetahs, goats, gorillas or evil humans. Tintin can depend on his loyalty and impressive initiative, Snowy and the Lion whether neutralizing high explosives by simply cocking his leg, or repeatedly freeing his master from his bonds. Despite his courage, there is one thing Snowy is afraid of — check out the Fun Facts below to find out what it is! Fun Facts about Snowy Hergé named Tintin’s faithful companion after his first girlfriend, whose nickname was “Milou” (Snowy’s name in the French-language versions of Tintin). Snowy talks less and barks more after the introduction of the chatty Captain Haddock — perhaps because he can’t get a word in edgewise! Snowy is afraid of only one thing: spiders.

 

Captain Haddock

When Captain Haddock makes his debut in The Crab with the Golden Claws, he makes quite an impression. First, he nearly puts an end to Tintin by burning the oars of their lifeboat to keep warm. As if that weren’t enough, he cracks Tintin over the head with a bottle as he’s piloting an aircraft, causing it to crash in the desert. Despite this inauspicious beginning, the captain goes on to become Tintin’s closest friend. As the stories progress, Captain Haddock proves himself to be much more than a clumsy, hotheaded sea captain with a colorful vocabulary. He is clearly a highly competent mariner and navigator, and his years of experience on the high seas prove invaluable in numerous adventures, including The Red Sea Sharks. Captain Haddock Pacing Real-life inspiration While Hergé admitted that there was a good deal of himself in Haddock, he also acknowledged that there was a measure of his colleague, Edgar-Pierre Jacobs, who had helped him adapt the Tintin books into color. As Hergé explained it, both Jacobs and Captain Haddock were “gruff, capable of expansive gestures and prone occasionally to minor mishaps.” As Hergé was considering names for his new character, he asked his wife, Germaine, what she had cooked for dinner. She told him, “a sad English fish — haddock.” Hergé thought it a perfect name for Tintin’s new mariner friend. Swearing (un)like a sailor Captain HaddockCaptain Haddock is famous for his imaginative and educational insults. In The Crab with the Golden Claws, the first adventure in which Haddock makes his appearance, he loses his temper with marksmen who have shattered his bottle of whiskey. His fury is unleashed in a torrent of colorful expletives: “Swine!….Jellyfish!….Tramps!….Troglodytes!….Toffee-noses!….Savages!….Aztecs!….Toads!….Carpet-sellers!…. Iconoclasts!….Rats!…. Ectoplasms!…. Freshwater swabs!….Bashibazouks!….Cannibals!…. Caterpillars!…. Cowards!….Baboons!….Parasites!…. Pockmarks!” Captain Haddock is constantly voted the most popular character in The Adventures of Tintin. Tintin fans have counted Captain Haddock’s insults, claiming that he has over 200 different variations! In the last Tintin adventure, Tintin and the Picaros, Captain Haddock’s first name is finally revealed: Archibald.

 

Thomson & Thompson

Thomson & Thompson, the world’s clumsiest policemen, make their first appearance in Cigars of the Pharaoh. Apart from Tintin and Snowy, they are the longest-running characters in the series, appearing in 20 of the 24 Tintin books. Despite the fact that they spend most of their time failing to solve crimes, dressing up in hopeless disguises and falling flat on their faces, Thomson and Thompson always end up on Tintin’s side, even if they do have to arrest him first! Real-life inspiration Thomson & ThompsonHergé’s father, Alexis Remi, had a twin brother named Léon. The brothers sometimes dressed in similar hats and suits when they went out together with walking sticks in hand. They even liked to repeat the French equivalent of Thomson & Thompson’s catchphrase: “To be precise!” It seems that the men’s antics made an impression on the young Georges Remi. The dim-witted detectives bring the slapstick comedy of Charlie Chaplin — whose films Hergé knew well — to the world of Tintin. As the reporter’s adventures continue, Thomson & Thompson’s whining and petty arguing bring to mind another pair of bowler-hatted buffoons: Laurel and Hardy! Fun Facts about Thomson & Thompson Thomson & Thompson Questions When they first appeared, Thomson & Thompson did not have proper names. They were referred to by their code names: X33 and X33a. Just like Thomson & Thompson, French and Belgian police in the early twentieth century did in fact wear black civilian suits — which were so recognizable, they were considered uniforms. The Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte painted bowler-hatted men bearing a striking resemblance to Thomson & Thompson in some of his most famous paintings.

 

Professor Calculus

In Red Rackham’s Treasure, Hergé introduces an endearing character who becomes close friends with Tintin and Captain Haddock for the rest of the adventures: Professor Calculus. Professor Calculus is an eccentric scientist, engineer and inventor who is as clever as he is absentminded. Despite his very slight physique, he claims to have been a sportsman in his youth, leading Captain Haddock to mockingly refer to him as the “Olympic athlete.” Although he is a capable scientist, Professor Calculus also practices the unproven method of divining using a pendulum. This mainly succeeds in infuriating Captain Haddock; however, though his odd approach does prove to have some merit in Red Rackham’s Treasure. Real-life inspiration Professor CalculusHergé’s model for Professor Calculus was a Swiss scientist named Auguste Piccard, who was a professor of physics at the University of Brussels from 1922 to 1954. Professor Piccard became famous in 1931, when he took off in a balloon of his own design and traveled 10 miles up into the atmosphere, higher than anyone else had reached before. Professor Calculus shares many character traits with the Swiss scientist, and even wears the same style of clothing as Piccard. The main difference between the men is in size: Professor Calculus is much shorter. As Hergé himself said, “I made Calculus a mini-Piccard, otherwise I would have had to enlarge the comic strip frames!” Fun Facts about Professor Calculus Professor Calculus Running Calculus is a secret romantic and pursues opera star Bianca Castafiore. Professor Calculus invents a rocket that can fly to the moon, but he has never learned to drive a car. The usually mild-mannered professor is prone to the occasional odd fit of anger, particularly when told he is “acting the goat” in Destination Moon.

 
 

Abdullah

The spoiled son of Emir Ben Kalish Ezab, Abdullah appears at Marlinspike Hall and instantly begins to cause trouble. Abdullah affectionately calls Captain Haddock “Blistering Barnacles”, but after all the pranks and exploding cigars, this is not enough to endear him to the Captain.

First appears in • Land of Black Gold

Endaddine Akass

A spiritual guru who seems to have everyone under his spell, Endaddine Akass is in fact a devious trickster with plenty of skeletons in his closet.

First appears in • Tintin and Alph-Art

General Alcazar

Tapioca, for control of San Theodoros, in his spare time, General Alcazar likes to play practical jokes with explosive punch lines!

First appears in • Tintin and the Broken Ear

Professor Hector Alembick

Professor Alembick is an expert in the study of wax seals. Little does the unsuspecting professor know that he is also the key to a ruthless plot to depose the king of Syldavia.

First appears in • King Ottokar's Sceptre

Alonso and Ramón

Ruthless knife-throwing villain Ramón and his partner in crime Alonso are determined to beat Tintin in the hunt for the stolen statue.

First appears in • Tintin and the Broken Ear

Barnaby

Barnaby is on the payroll of the Bird Brothers. When he decides to spill the beans to Tintin, Barnaby is ruthlessly gunned down.

First appears in • The Secret of the Unicor

Mr. Baxter

Mr. Baxter is the director of the Sprodj Atomic Research Centre, the secret facility in which Professor Calculus is building a rocket to fly to the moon. Mr. Baxter is kind and welcoming, but when things get serious, he doesn’t mince his words.

First appears in • Destination Moon

Big Chief Keen-eyed Mole

Leader of the Blackfoot Indians in Tintin in America, Big Chief Keen-eyed Mole won’t hesitate to defend his tribe against the enemy. Unfortunately, he’s been tricked into thinking that the enemy is Tintin!

First appears in • Tintin in America

Bill

As the talkative chef onboard the Sirius in Red Rackham’s Treasure, Bill is happy as long as Snowy stays out of his kitchen!

First appears in • Red Rackham’s Treasure

The Bird Brothers

As greedy antique dealers in The Secret of the Unicorn, the Bird Brothers won’t let anything or anyone get in their way. They are highly dangerous criminals.

First appears in • The Secret of the Unicorn

Mr. Bohlwinkel

In The Shooting Star, Mr. Bohlwinkel is intent on exploiting the new substance detected by Professor Phostle for his own financial gain — and uses his international business network to thwart Tintin’s team!

First appears in • The Shooting Star

Mr. Bolt

In The Castafiore Emerald, Mr. Bolt is a builder who is always promising to show up and fix a broken step on the staircase at Marlinspike Hall.

First appears in • The Castafiore Emerald

Colonel Boris

As the trusted aide-de-camp to King Muskar XII in King Ottokar’s Sceptre, scheming Boris uses his position to trap Tintin. The villain clearly doesn’t know who he’s up against!

First appears in • King Ottokar’s Sceptre

Borschtisov

One of many Bolshevik terrorists Tintin meets in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Borschtisov is on a mission to blow up all the capital cities of Europe...after he has trapped Tintin!

First appears in • Tintin in the Land of the Soviets

Rascar Capac

After this Incan mummy is brought back from Peru in The Seven Crystal Balls, Professor Tarragon keeps it at his villa until one fateful night, when it vanishes in a flash of lightning. But the sinister Rascar Capac soon reappears...in Tintin’s dreams!

First appears in • The Seven Crystal Balls

Al Capone

The self-proclaimed King of Chicago doesn’t have time for pleasantries in Tintin in the Congo or Tintin in America — he just wants to get rid of Tintin once and for all.

First appears in • Tintin in the Congo

Lazlo Carreidas

Despite being known as “the man who never laughs,” this billionaire tycoon from Flight 714 could also be the richest man in the world. His global businesses sell everything from soft drinks to aircraft.

First appears in • Flight 714

Bianca Castafiore

The first time Tintin meets the opera singer from Milan in King Ottokar’s Sceptre, Bianca Castafiore manages to save the reporter from an ambush. In The Calculus Affair, The Castafiore Emerald, Tintin and the Picaros and Tintin and Alph-Art, she mixes spontaneous arias with the occasional diva tantrum.

First appears in • King Ottokar’s Sceptre

Chang

This young Chinese orphan becomes Tintin’s best friend in The Blue Lotus. Tintin in Tibet follows Tintin’s efforts to rescue Chang, who is presumed dead after an air crash in the Himalayas.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

Captain Chester

Just when it looks like Tintin and Captain Haddock have been beaten in The Shooting Star, one of Haddock’s old friends, Captain Chester, shows up to help!

First appears in • The Shooting Star

Dawson

As the corrupt police chief of the Shanghai International Settlement in The Blue Lotus, Dawson will do anyone a favor if there is something in it for himself. He later returns as an arms dealer under the alias “Debrett” in The Red Sea Sharks.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

Lieutenant Delcourt

In The Crab with the Golden Claws, Lieutenant Delcourt is in command of the outpost of Afghar. His men rescue Tintin and Captain Haddock when they crash their airplane in the Sahara Desert.

First appears in • The Crab with the Golden Claws

Corporal Diaz

Allegiances are always shifting in the unstable Latin American country of San Theodoros. Demoted from his position as colonel in Tintin and The Broken Ear, Corporal Diaz is determined to get his revenge.

First appears in • Tintin and The Broken Ear

Didi

Didi is Mr. Wang Chen-yee’s son in The Blue Lotus. Though he rescues Tintin at the beginning of the adventure, Didi becomes a sword-wielding danger when he is poisoned with Rajaijah juice.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

The Director of KIDNAP Inc

This ruthless character from Tintin in America likes to keep his trusty sword stick with him at all times. Watch out: he’s got a point to make!

First appears in • Tintin in America

Emir Ben Kalish Ezab

In Land of Black Gold, the Emir of Khemed, Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab, refuses to make a deal with the sinister Dr. Müller — leading Müller to kidnap his son, Abdullah. The emir appears again in The Red Sea Sharks and Tintin and Alph-Art.

First appears in • Land of Black Gold

The Fakir

In Cigars of the Pharaoh, weapons are no match for the malevolent fakir — look into his eyes and you are under his hypnotic power!

First appears in • Cigars of the Pharaoh

Henri Fourcart

In Tintin and Alph-Art, Henri Fourcart is the director of an art gallery in which the work of Ramó Nash is displayed. He has something important to tell Tintin and sets off to meet him…but will he make it in time?

First appears in • Tintin and Alph-Art

Mr. Gibbons

Gibbons is a greedy industrialist whom readers first come across in The Blue Lotus. In Tintin and Alph-Art, he turns up at a party thrown at Akass’s villa.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

The Grand Abbot

In Tintin in Tibet, it looks like Tintin and his friends have been wiped out by an avalanche — but they are rescued by monks from a desolate mountain monastery. The abbot of the monastery makes his guests welcome and gives Tintin a new name: “Great Heart.”

First appears in • Tintin in Tibet

Sir Francis Haddock

Captain Haddock’s brave ancestor, Sir Francis, was the Commander of the Unicorn (see The Secret of the Unicorn) and the archenemy of Red Rackham (see Red Rackham’s Treasure).

First appears in • The Secret of the Unicorn

Huascar

Huascar is an Incan descendant who witnesses Tintin bravely rescuing Zorrino from cruel foreigners in Prisoners of the Sun. He gives Tintin a sacred talisman for protection.

First appears in • Prisoners of the Sun

Irma

Irma, another member of Castafiore’s entourage, is usually mild-mannered. But when accused of theft by the world’s most useless police detectives in The Castafiore Emerald, it all proves too much to take.

First appears in • The Calculus Affair

Ivan

Although he is only the chauffeur for the crooks in The Black Island, Ivan proves himself only too ready to carry out the real dirty work.

First appears in • The Black Island

Colonel Jorgen

In Explorers on the Moon, Frank Wolff helps smuggle the dangerous criminal Colonel Jorgen aboard the moon rocket. Jorgen doesn’t think twice about leaving crew members on the moon to perish — but Tintin won’t let him get away with that!

First appears in • Explorers on the Moon

Mik Kanrokitoff

A scientist who has developed a special ability to communicate by thought, Mik Kanrokitoff has been in contact with extraterrestrials for some time. In Flight 714, Kanrokitoff proves to be a key ally to Tintin and his friends.

First appears in • Flight 714

Dr. Krollspell

The sinister Dr. Krollspell has invented a truth serum that he is only too willing to put in the service of Rastapopoulos in Flight 714. But when he finds out what the evil mastermind has in store for him, Krollspell is quick to change sides!

First appears in • Flight 714

Bunji Kuraki

At the beginning of The Crab with the Golden Claws, this Japanese man is kidnapped — while holding a letter for Tintin!

First appears in • The Crab with the Golden Claws

Mike MacAdam

In Tintin in America, this hotel detective at first appears to have an amazing sixth sense for solving crimes — but it’s not long before the incompetent investigator bungles his case.

First appears in • Tintin in America

The Maharaja of Gaipajama

The dignified Maharaja of Gaipajama welcomes Tintin into his palace in Cigars of the Pharaoh, and the heroic reporter returns the favor.

First appears in • Cigars of the Pharaoh

The Missionary Priest

The kindly missionary priest helps to get Tintin out of a tight spot, and shows the young reporter the school and hospital buildings that have been constructed under his direction.

First appears in • Tintin In The Congo

Mitsuhirato

As a secret agent and opium smuggler masquerading as a businessman in The Blue Lotus, Mitsuhirato is determined to get rid of Tintin once and for all.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

Dr. Müller

As the evil mastermind behind the illegal operation that Tintin investigates in The Black Island, Dr. Müller won’t hesitate to use his medical training for harmful ends. In Land of Black Gold, he will do anything to get rich from the international oil trade.

First appears in • The Black Island

King Muskar XII

The just and noble King of Syldavia from King Ottokar’s Sceptre comes from an established lineage of great leaders. Will the king manage to overcome plotters determined to force him from his throne?

First appears in • King Ottokar’s Sceptre

Ramó Nash

In Tintin and Alph-Art, Nash is an artist specializing in what is known as “Alph-Art”— art created using the letters of the alphabet. But he may also be involved in a shady parallel business forging the work of other famous artists.

First appears in • Tintin and Alph-Art

Nestor

Nestor is the dependable and loyal servant at Marlinspike Hall in Red Rackham’s Treasure, The Seven Crystal Balls and Tintin and the Picaros.

First appears in • The Secret of the Unicorn

Nokzitov

A Soviet bounty hunter in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Nokzitov thinks that he has caught Tintin and is looking forward to his reward from the OGPU. But Tintin won’t give up without a fight.

First appears in • Tintin in the Land of the Soviets

Ogpu Agent from Stolbtzy

This cunning Soviet agent first tries to trip Tintin up with a banana skin, then disguises himself as a beggar to take advantage of Tintin’s kindness in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets.

First appears in • Tintin in the Land of the Soviets

The Old Shopkeeper

A beady-eyed old man who has a diving suit for sale, the shopkeeper in Red Rackham’s Treasure appears to be able to read Captain Haddock’s mind. Blistering barnacles!

First appears in • Red Rackham’s Treasure

Senhor Oliveira da Figueira

This friendly and talkative character returns several times in Tintin’s adventures, including Cigars of the Pharaoh, Land of Black Gold and The Red Sea Sharks.

First appears in • Cigars of the Pharaoh

Maurice Oyle

Maurice Oyle is a manager at the Grynde industrial estate in Tintin in America. He can’t wait to show Tintin around, but perhaps he’s a little too eager to please.

First appears in • Tintin in America

Pablo

Originally sent to assassinate Tintin and The Broken Ear, Pablo ends up saving the reporter’s life. In Tintin and the Picaros, Tintin returns the favor.

First appears in • Tintin and The Broken Ear

Sheik Patrash Pasha

The tribal sheik seems threatening at first in Cigars of the Pharaoh, but his anger turns to joy when he realizes whom his attendants have captured!

First appears in • Cigars of the Pharaoh

Peggy

In Tintin and the Picaros, General Alcazar’s dragon of a wife, Peggy, clearly wears the trousers in the General’s household.

First appears in • Tintin and the Picaros

Philippulus the Prophet

In The Shooting Star, Philippulus the Prophet loves banging his drum and forecasting doom and gloom. It almost seems like he’s looking forward to the end of the world!

First appears in • The Shooting Star

Professor Decimus Phostle

Together with Tintin and some top scientists in The Shooting Star, this professor sets out to find a meteorite that has fallen into the Arctic Ocean.

First appears in • The Shooting Star

Prince of the Sun

In Prisoners of the Sun, the noble Prince of the Sun governs the hidden Incan civilization according to traditions that stretch back over hundreds of years. There can be only one sentence handed out to those who violate the inner chambers of the sacred temple — death!

First appears in • Prisoners of the Sun

Puschov

Puschov is a member of the criminal gang that Tintin hunts down in The Black Island. The villain tries to convince Tintin to practice diving… off a cliff!

First appears in • The Black Island

Ranko The Gorilla

The beast of The Black Island turns out to be a gorilla called Ranko. Although he is trained to be fierce, Tintin and Snowy bring out his true gentle nature.

First appears in • The Black Island

Rastapopoulos

Tintin’s first meeting with Rastapopoulos, “King of Cosmos Pictures” in The Cigars of the Pharaoh, doesn’t go well. He appears again, stirring up trouble in The Blue Lotus, The Red Sea Sharks and Flight 714.

First appears in • The Cigars of the Pharaoh

Red Rackham

Red Rackham was a ruthless and bloodthirsty pirate who lived over 300 years ago and whose legacy is rediscovered in The Secret of the Unicorn and Red Rackham’s Treasure.

First appears in • The Secret of the Unicorn

Ridgewell

Long-lost explorer Ridgewell has traded “civilized” life for the jungle in Tintin and The Broken Ear. In Tintin and the Picaros, he helps Tintin and his friends get an invitation to share a meal with the ferocious Arumbaya tribe.

First appears in • Tintin and The Broken Ear

Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine

In The Secret of the Unicorn, Ivan Sakharine collects maritime memorabilia, including model ships, and seems determined to buy a model ship that Tintin has just acquired. But at what price?

First appears in • The Secre of the Unicorn

Omar Ben Salaad

Appearing in The Crab with the Golden Claws, Omar is the biggest trader in Bagghar — but his business is just a front for his nefarious smuggling activities.

First appears in • The Crab with the Golden Claws

Sophocles Sarcophagus

Doctor Sarcophagus only has one thing on his mind throughout Cigars of the Pharaoh: ancient Egyptian pharaohs!

First appears in • Cigars of the Pharaoh

Shark Submarine

The smiling shark submarine, a favorite with readers, plays a key role in the hunt for the shipwreck of the Unicorn in Red Rackham’s Treasure.

First appears in • Red Rackham’s Treasure

Sherpa Tharkey

Sherpa Tharkey is a Nepalese mountain guide in Tintin in Tibet. At first he is determined to dissuade Tintin from setting off on the perilous search for Chang, but eventually he agrees to lead the expedition.

First appears in • Tintin in Tibet

Skut

Skut is an Estonian pilot following orders to attack the boat Tintin and Haddock are traveling on in The Red Sea Sharks. But when he’s forced to bail out of his plane, Tintin and Haddock rescue him from the Red Sea, and Skut becomes a key ally of the heroes from this point on, showing up a second time in Flight 714.

First appears in • The Red Sea Sharks

Bobby Smiles

Villain Bobby Smiles in Tintin in America is very sure of himself. He even has the nerve to offer Tintin a job in his criminal gang!

First appears in • Tintin in America

Spalding

Spalding is Lazlo Carreidas’s secretary in Flight 714. Although he is publicly humiliated by his boss, this is nothing compared with the devious and dastardly surprise Spalding has in store for Carreidas.

First appears in • Flight 714

Colonel Sponsz

In The Calculus Affair, Colonel Sponsz is the head of the Bordurian Secret Police, ZEP. He is a ruthless character who is determined to trap Tintin and his friends.

First appears in • The Calculus Affair

General Tapioca

In Tintin and the Picaros, General Tapioca, the sworn enemy of General Alcazar, has had Bianca Castafiore arrested on a trumped-up charge. Professor Calculus and Captain Haddock set off to negotiate her release, but it seems nothing less than a regime change will do the trick.

First appears in • Tintin and the Picaros

Professor Tarragon

After escaping a mysterious sickness that strikes down his colleagues in The Seven Crystal Balls, Professor Tarragon gets a visit from Tintin, Snowy, Haddock and his old friend, Calculus. It proves to be a night they will never forget.

First appears in • The Seven Crystal Balls

Allan Thompson

Crooked Allan is the first mate of the ship named the Karaboudjan in The Crab with the Golden Claws. He then shows up again later as the assistant of the evil Rastapopoulos in Flight 714.

First appears in • The Crab with the Golden Claws

Tom

Tom is a gangster working for Al Capone who is determined to get Tintin out of the way, through a series of nasty traps.

First appears in • Tintin In The Congo

Professor Topolino

Professor Alfredo Topolino is a Swiss scientist and expert in ultrasonics. A planned meeting with Professor Calculus in The Calculus Affair is disrupted when Topolino is attacked. But there is worse to come: his house is blown up by Bordurian agents!

First appears in • The Calculus Affair

Mr. Trickler

Mr. Trickler first appears in Tintin and The Broken Ear as the representative of General American Oil. In Tintin and Alph-Art, Trickler will stop short at nothing — not even war — to get rich.

First appears in • Tintin and The Broken Ear

Trovik

A key member of the criminal organization planning to overthrow the King of Syldavia, Trovik coordinates multiple attempts to get Tintin out of the way… permanently!

First appears in • King Ottokar's Sceptre

Martine Vandezande

Martine Vandezande is the assistant at the Fourcart art gallery in Tintin and Alph-Art. Little does she know that the pendant given to her by Endaddine Akass has been bugged.

First appears in • Tintin and Alph-Art

Jolyon Wagg

Jolyon Wagg is an irritating insurance salesman in The Calculus Affair, who knocks on the door at Marlinspike Hall, expecting to be given shelter from a storm. He shows up again in The Castafiore Emerald and Tintin and the Picaros.

First appears in • The Calculus Affair

Wagner

Bianca Castafiore’s obedient pianist, Wagner, comes to Marlinspike Hall as part of her entourage in The Castafiore Emerald. But is he hiding something?

First appears in • King Ottokar's Sceptre

Mr. Wang Chen-yee

In The Blue Lotus, Mr. Wang Chen-yee is the leader of the Sons of the Dragon, a secret society dedicated to fighting the illegal opium trade.

First appears in • The Blue Lotus

Frank Wolff

Frank Wolff seems like a helpful and intelligent assistant working on Professor Calculus’s Moon Project in Destination Moon and Explorers on the Moon. But perhaps there is more to Wolff than meets the eye?

First appears in • Destination Moon

The Yeti

Although the Yeti is not a human being, he is an important character in Tintin in Tibet. At first it seems that the Yeti is a dangerous animal, but by the end of the adventure, it is clear that the “Abominable Snowman” actually has deep feelings of compassion.

First appears in • Tintin in Tibet

Ramón Zarate

When Tintin and Haddock go out for a night’s entertainment at the Hippodrome in The Seven Crystal Balls, one of the first acts is hosted by an amazing knife-thrower named Ramón Zarate who looks oddly familiar: it’s General Alcazar!

First appears in • Tintin and the Broken Ear

Zorrino

Tintin saves Zorrino from bullies in Prisoners of the Sun, and the young orange-seller is determined to return the favor. He becomes a guide for Tintin, Haddock and Snowy, leading them through the Andes to the Temple of the Sun.

First appears in • Prisoners of the Sun


Notes

User Reviews

I can't imagine Tintin or any other characters from the Tintin books played by actors, I just think it would botch up the characters. I can only imagine them either as comic book characters or cartoon characters. This Tintin cartoon series is as close as you could possibly get to the Tintin comic books. The characters all look and sound exactly as they do in the comic books. Each episode of the Tintin cartoon (either one or two part episodes) has basically the same story as in each of the Tintin books. Not just the same story, the same characters the same settings even some of the same quotes. I've enjoyed the Tintin cartoon series as well as the Tintin books ever since I was a child. Tintin is basically meant for children but a number of adults like Tintin as well. Some episodes of the Tintin cartoon have been available on video but I wish all the entire series was available on DVD. For those who aren't familiar with Tintin, the main characters in the Tintin saga isn't just Tintin the intrepid reporter and adventurer and his clever little dog Snowy. Tintin has friends who are often with him on his adventures. They include Captain Haddock the grumpy sailor, Professor Cusburt Calculous a genius scientist but at the same time a rather stupid person, and Thompson and Thomson the clumsy detective twins. Captain Haddock is a rather bad tempered seaman, most likely because he drinks too much whiskey. He often uses exclamations like "Blistering Barnacles!" or "Thundering Typhoons!" or if he was really outraged or amazed he would say "Billions of blistering blue barnacles!" or "Ten thousand thundering typhoons!" Professor Calculous is an amazing inventor. He's invented some amazing things for example a "shark-proof submarine", a drug which makes alcoholic drinks taste disgusting to cure alcoholic addicted people and a rocket ship to travel to the moon. But he's also rather stupid because he's deaf and always miss hears what people say. He also ignores non-verbal communication and pretends that he doesn't understand how angry Captain Haddock is which really drives him mad.
Thompson and Thomson or "the Thompson's" as they're usually called are both rather stupid detectives and often have clumsy accidents. One of the Thompson's is often saying "to be precise" correcting the other Thompson and since they're identical twins and always wear the same clothing you've no idea which Thompson it is. They think they're the worlds best detectives but Tintin always proves to be a much better detective then they'll ever be. So the the Tintin saga is more than just great adventure and detective stories for children but also a combination of rather humorous characters which will delight audiences of all ages.

 

 

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